Theatre Company Defiant After Tyres Slashed At ‘Holding The Man’


A Sydney theatre company has said it “won’t be silenced” after cast, crew and audience members at a performance of “Holding The Man” had their tyres slashed.

At least 12 people had their tyres damaged at Lane Cove Theatre Company’s performance of the stage version of Timothy Conigrave’s autobiographical same-sex love story on Saturday.

LCTC’s President Lochie Beh said posters advertising the play had also been torn down.

“In today’s society and especially in the Lane Cove community this behaviour needs to be condemned. Whether one supports the content of the play we are producing or not, this behaviour is unacceptable,” he said.

“Having our posters torn down is one thing, but being targeted by deliberate vandalism is quite another.

“Not only were members of the audience targeted but some of them travelled from interstate to see the show and had to then find accommodation for the evening.”

The company is now crowdfunding to pay for repairs and emergency accommodation for the victims of the attack.

They wrote on their Facebook page: “We will not be silenced by cowardly attempts at bigotry.

“There is no doubt that the whole same-sex marriage debate and plebiscite is fuelling the flames of hatred and making people take stands.

“It’s heartbreaking that some people believe that others are not deserving of equal rights, but at Lane Cove Theatre Company we will never stop fighting until inequality in all forms is a thing of the past.”

NSW Police said they were called to the theatre after reports vehicles had been damaged, and said all motives would be investigated.

Local Liberal MP Trent Zimmerman, who attended the play’s opening night, said the “appalling” attack should be condemned.

“To have the tyres of patrons and the crews slashed is just completely unacceptable and not something we should be tolerating in Australian society,” he said.

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