Campaigners Want To Hear Your Marriage Equality Stories For New Book


Two marriage equality campaigners have announced they will write a book detailing the history of the campaign for marriage equality over the last decade and earlier.

Alex Greenwich and Dr Shirleene Robinson want to chronicle the efforts of the countless Australians who worked towards the reform, and have called for people to contribute their own stories.

The book, titled YES YES YES, will be released this November to mark the one year anniversary of the “yes” vote in the marriage law postal survey.

“So many people, over so many years, contributed to the achievement of marriage equality,” Dr Robinson (pictured, second from left) told the Star Observer.

“We look forward to sharing their stories and detailing a movement that, through adversity, brought Australians together and proved that love wins.”

Greenwich (pictured, right) said the book will tell the story of Australia’s “hard fought and challenging” journey to marriage equality.

“It didn’t follow a perfect or easy path, but the passionate work of campaigners, advocates, volunteers and politicians finally delivered love a landslide victory and shaped Australia as a fairer and more equal place for all,” he said.

The authors have partnered with the non-profit group Australian Lesbian and Gay Archives (ALGA) to create a webform allowing Australians to tell their marriage equality stories.

Authors are able to choose whether the stories can be preserved by ALGA, published in the book or made accessible to other researchers and future generations of LGBTIQ people.

Greenwich said he wants the book to serve as inspiration for other supporters in countries where marriage equality has not yet been achieved.

“Around the world there are still many countries that are on the way to achieving marriage equality,” he said.

“We hope this book can share how Australia did it, and share our leanings, challenges and victories to help campaigns in other countries deliver the freedom to marry for all.”

ALGA curator and archivist Nick Henderson said the diverse stories of the marriage equality campaign collected in the project “will be a vital research resource, not only for this new publication but also for future generations who wish to understand the impact of the marriage equality campaign on the Australian LGBTI community.”

The volunteers from ALGA have collected and preserved more than 100,000 pieces of LGBTI historical material since 1978, and are this year celebrating the group’s 40th anniversary with a float in the Sydney Mardi Gras.

For more information about ALGA and to support their work with a donation or membership, visit their website.