Half Of New Zealand’s Same-Sex Marriages Are Overseas Couples


Half of all same-sex marriages registered in New Zealand last year were couples living overseas, according to new data from Statistics New Zealand.

Population statistics manager Peter Dolan said this figure was in comparison to 11 percent of overseas opposite-sex couples.

“Couples from Australia accounted for 58 percent of overseas same-sex couples coming here to marry,” he said, adding a further 17 percent of couples came from China.

In 2016, 483 New Zealand resident couples and 471 overseas resident couples celebrated same-sex marriages or civil unions.

Twenty-one percent of same-sex couples from overseas had one or both partners born in New Zealand, compared with 56 percent of opposite-sex couples.

Despite same-sex marriage being illegal on this side of the ditch, hundreds of Aussie couples have also gotten married in British consulates around Australia since the UK legalised marriage equality in 2014.

The UK’s Consular Marriages and Marriages under Foreign Law Order 2014 means any same-sex couple with at least one UK passport can get married in a British consulate located in several countries where marriage equality is illegal.

At one ceremony recently filmed by the BBC, newlyweds Ben and Simon quipped: “This is honoured by the Queen goddamnit. So who is more important to you? The Queen, or your bigotry?”